Tag Archive | Buddhism

Iconography in Indian Art


Nataraja

The construction of divine images and their subsequent meditation and worship brought pureness in thinking and gave mental peace to the human being. Iconography means depiction of images through different artistic style. In Indian sculptural art, images are the symbolic representations of divinity whose origin and end is expressed through the religious and spiritual beliefs. Read More…

[Part 2] Iconography in India: Buddhism


The Dhyani Buddhas are peculiar kind of Buddhas, Who are not required to pass surpass the stages of a Bodhisattva. They are always engaged in peaceful meditation and abstain themselves from the act of creation. Among the Dhyani Buddhas, Amitabha always faces west when he is represented on ‘Stupa’. His two hands with palm open lie on his lap one upon the other forming the meditative posture. ‘Maitreya may be represented as a standing figure, adorned by rich ornaments and holding stalk of lotus on his right hand. He is shown with Dharma chakra mudra through his right hand while holding vase on his left hand.

Following are the important Mudras commonly represented in Buddha images :

Abhaya

Buddhism- Abhaya

Abhaya means ‘no fear’ and this mudra shows the Buddha giving blessings, reassurance and protection to his followers.

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[Part 2] Ethics and Values in India: Ethics in Indian Religions


Ethics in Hinduism

Doctrine of Karma

This doctrine asserts that whatever a person suffers/enjoys is a fruit of his own deeds. This doctrine introduces the concept of cycles of births, in which, an individual take rebirth after living a life. Through his karma of the previous birth, his fate is determined for the present birth. Karma can be of four types- Sanchit karma, which means the accumulated past actions; Prarabdha karma, which means the part of karma which has been done in the present birth; Kriyamana karma, which means the present voluntary actions of the free will; and Agami karma, which means the immediate result caused by our present actions. Read More…