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Child Labour in India


Child labour in India is biggest problem in India. The main reason is poverty and lack of social security. Commercialisation of education and lack of good quality of education and facilities in the government school do not able to stop the child labour. This situation has to be evaluated at the current scenario.

As we know that child are the future of the country, but the mud of child labour become very harmful to the child rather it is directly affect the future of the nation. Therefore, Government of India has enacted Right to Education (RTE) and also amended Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Amendment Act, 2016 to keep distance from child labouring as well as facilitate the better and free education, easy admission in schools, listened the children’s health to prohibit the engagement of children in all occupations and of adolescents in hazardous occupations and processes and facilitate the rules and regulation of convention of International Labour Organisation (ILO).

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Function and Power of the presiding officer of Lok Sabha


Since the Indian system of government follows the Westminster Model, the parliamentary proceedings of the country are headed by a presiding officer who is called a Speaker. The Lok Sabha or the Lower House of the People in India, which is the highest legislative body in the country, chooses its Speaker who presides over the day-to-day functioning of the House. Thus, the Speaker plays the crucial role of ensuring that the Lok Sabha carries forward its role of legislation peacefully, maintaining harmony in the Houses of Parliament and taking crucial procedural decisions of the House. The Speaker is thus, in every sense, considered the true guardian of the Indian Parliamentary democracy, holding the complete authority of the Lok Sabha.  Article 93 of the Constitution says that the House of the People (Lok Sabha) shall, as soon as may be, choose two members of the House to be respectively Speaker and Deputy Speaker. Speaker has one of the important power is to decide whether a Bill is a Money Bill or not and his decision on this question is final.

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Direct Benefit Transfer (DBT): Mechanism to change the scenario of subsidies in India


Before moving on to the discussion on Direct Benefit Transfer (DBT) scheme, firstly we have to understand- ‘what is Subsidy and why it is given?’   Subsidy is a mechanism of welfare state in which government extended its support to the institution, business or individual in the form of a cash payment or a tax reduction. It is generally used as a form of support for particular portions of a nation’s economy which can assist struggling markets by lowering the burdens placed on them, or encourage new developments by providing financial support for the endeavors.

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Make in India and Digital India: Policy to improve farm productivity and income


Make in India and Digital India both are Incumbent government’s flagship programs. The concept of Make in India initiative was launched to boost the domestic industry and to attract foreign investors to invest the Indian economy. The prime objective of the initiatives is to revive the manufacturing industries and create congeal environment to the entrepreneurs in way of the ease of business whereas Digital India was launched to transform India into a digitally empowered society and knowledge economy. It provides the intensified impetus for further momentum and progress for e-Governance and would promote inclusive growth that covers electronic services, products, devices, manufacturing and job opportunities. Both the policies complement each other and have potential to transform the Indian society.

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Demonetisation of Indian Currency Notes: Implications and Effects


What demonetisation is….

The act of banning a currency of being a legal tender is termed as demonetisation. Whenever a country changes its national currency in order to curb counterfeiting and money-laundering, it issues a notice of demonetisation of its older currency of particular denomination and the particular currency is retired and replaced with the new currency. A recent example of demonetisation is that of 500 and 1000 denomination currency units of India.

Demonetisation of 500 and 1000 denomination currency in India

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Inter-States River Water Disputes in India


The rivers of India play a vital role in the sustenance of lives of millions of Indians. They form the major irrigation system. They form the habitat of marine lives.

With the growing population, the demand for water has been increasing exponentially after independence. A river is merely freely running water which can emerge from one state, flows through another state and ends in third state. The uprising of Cauvery river dispute between Karnataka and Tamil Nadu has blown fire to the scenario of inter-state water disputes. Most of these disputes have been resolved on the basis of unbiased allotment by the central government. Whenever required, negotiation through appointment of water disputes tribunals is also resorted.

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Timeline of Cauvery Dispute


TIMELINE OVER CAUVERY WATER DISPUTES TRIBUNAL

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May 1990: Supreme Court directs Centre to constitute Cauvery Water Dispute Tribunal, a demand made by Tamil Nadu since 1970.

June 1990: Centre notifies Cauvery Water Disputes Tribunal (CWDT).

June 1991: The CWDT announced an interim award: Karnataka ordered to release 205 tmcft. In a move to nullify the interim awards, Karnataka government passes an Ordinance. Supreme Court intervenes, strikes down Karnataka’s ordinance and upholds the interim award of the CWDT. Karnataka refuses to oblige.

September 2002: Cauvery River Authority chaired by Prime Minister A.B. Vajpayee directs Karnataka to release 9,000 cusecs (0.8 tmcft) of Cauvery water to Tamil Nadu. Tamil Nadu unhappy with the order says it will move Supreme Court.

July 2005: Karnataka refuses to implement the distress sharing formula and rules out Cauvery water to Tamil Nadu.

February 2007: After 16 years, Cauvery Water Disputes Tribunal holds as valid the two agreements of 1892 and 1924 executed between the governments of Madras and Mysore on the apportionment of water to Tamil Nadu

September 2012: At the seventh meeting of the CRA, Manmohan Singh directs Karnataka to release 9,000 cusecs of Cauvery water to Tamil Nadu at Biligundlu. Both the CMs — Jayalalithaa and Jagadish Shettar — term it “unacceptable”. This is the first CRA meet since the UPA came to power at the Centre in 2004.

February 2013: The Centre notifies the final award of the Cauvery Water Disputes Tribunal (CWDT). The Central government was mandated to constitute the Cauvery Management Board (CMB) simultaneously with the gazette notification of the final award of the Tribunal dated February 19.

March 10, 2013: The Tamil Nadu chief minister says she will work for the formation of the Cauvery Water Board during a felicitation ceremony organised in Thanjavur for her efforts to get the final award notified in the Union gazette.

March 2013: Tamil Nadu moves the Supreme Court to give directions to the water ministry for constitution of the Cauvery Management Board.

May 2013: Tamil Nadu moves Supreme Court, seeking Rs 2,480 crore in damages from Karnataka for not following the orders of the Cauvery Water Disputes Tribunal.

June 2013: The Union water resources secretary chairs the first meeting of the supervisory committee in which Tamil Nadu demanded its share of water for June as stipulated in the award.

June 2013: Karnataka says it cannot release 134 tmcft of water to Tamil Nadu between June and September.

July 2013: Karnataka and Tamil Nadu clash during the third meeting of the Cauvery Supervisory Committee over the latter’s share of the river water. While Tamil Nadu sought 34 tmcft in July and 50 tmcft in August to save the Samba crop, Karnataka says that it had already released 34 tmcft between June and July 13.

August 2016: Tamil Nadu asks the Supreme Court to direct Karnataka to release water to Tamil Nadu after Siddaramiah says there is no water in the reservoirs.

September 2016: SC directs Karnataka to release 15,000 cusecs a day till Sept 15. Protests break out in Karnataka

Role of News Media as Civic Forum


Equality vital, in their civic forum, the free press can strengthen the public sphere, by mediating between citizens and the state, facilitating debate about the major issues of the day, and informing the public about their leaders. If the channels of communication reflect the social and cultural pluralism within each society, in a fair and impartial balance, then multiple interests and voices are heard in public deliberation.  This role is particularly important during election campaigns, as fair access to the  airwaves by opposition parties, candidates and groups is critical  for competitive, free and fair multiparty elections.

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During  campaigns, a free media provides citizens with information to compare and evaluate the retrospective record, prospective policies and leadership characteristics of parties and candidates, providing the essential conditions for informed choice.

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List of Policies/ Programmes/ Schemes of the Government of India [Part III]


List of Policies/Programmes/Schemes of the Government of India [Part III] with features and objectives that will help you in the preparation of different competitive examination.

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List of Policies/Programmes/Schemes of the Government of India [Part II]


List of Policies/Programmes/Schemes of the Government of India [Part II] with features and objectives that will help you in the preparation of different competitive examination.

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